• Shoulder Pain & Limited ROM

    Posted on March 28, 2019 by Dawn in Anatomy, Back & Spine, bodywork, Human Body, massage therapy, Ribs, Shoulders, SMRT, Spontaneous Muscle Release Technique.

    Referral

    Last week I saw a new client sent to me by a doctor I know. She has shoulder pain and limited ROM. The doctor had sent her to physical therapy because her insurance would pay for physical therapy. The physical therapist could do nothing to her shoulder without her feeling intense pain and making him stop. Each intervention the physical therapist tried led to the client having pain and making him stop.

    Fewer Pressure Points

    She told her doctor that she was unable to do physical therapy, which is when the doctor sent her to me for SMRT. With SMRT we can lower tone, increase ROM, and decrease pain and tenderness without directly touching the area. I tested the movement of the shoulder, took in to account her posture, and tested the mobility of the skin. Using this information, I did SMRT positions for serratus anterior, latissiumus, and the teres muscles. When I did a position for pectoralis minor, her entire shoulder relaxed, she took a deep breath, and sighed.

    I asked if she thought I might be able to touch her shoulder. She agreed. I began to gently palpate her deltoid. She reported no pain. I gently palpated upper trap and supraspinatus, no pain. So then, I gently palpated her pectoral muscles, no pain. I went a little bit deeper. She said she could feel it, but it wasn’t pain. I stopped there and began to do SMRT again. After a few more positions, I palpated again and her body let me in a little further without pain. Next, I passively tested her shoulder ROM. She was amazed. Then, I asked her to move her shoulder and again, she was amazed.

    She saw the doctor the next day and returned to physical therapy. I have another appointment with her this week.
    I would love to teach you how to do SMRT for the shoulder, axilla, ribcage, & upper back in Asheville, NC over Memorial day weekend, May 25-27, 2019. 10% discount ends on April 25, 2019. Register now!