• Iliotibial Band (ITB)

    Posted on September 3, 2014 by Dawn in Human Body, massage therapy, Massage Therapy Continuing Education, Muscle Pain, NCBTMB approved continuing education, Physiology, Questions and Answers, Spontaneous Muscle Release Technique.

     

    The iliotibial band (ITB) or tract (ITT) is for some of us impenetrable.

    I have clients who use foam rollers, percussers, heavy stretching with bands, etc. and still cannot effectively soften the ITT.

    I have students who use t-bars, elbows, stretches, deep pressure, etc. and, after all that work, simply do not get the results they desire with the ITT.

    The ITT originates on the external lip of the iliac crest, where it is combined with the gluteal aponeurosis. It inserts on the lateral condyle of the tibia at Gerdy’s tubercle. Inserting into the ITT are gluteus maximus and tensor fasciae latae.

    Muscles of Hip and Thigh - Lateral View

    In a recent SMRT: Hips & Sacrum class, I threw in an ITT release. As I walked around the room, several students were aghast at how quickly (20 to 30 seconds) and how fully the ITT had softened.

    Tension in the ITT suggests a postural misalignment between the hip and knee.

    This could be caused by tension in the hip tissue; sacroiliac joint misalignments; immobility at the knee; tension in the tissue of the lower leg; ankle imbalances; immobility of the tarsals and metatarsals.

    Reducing tension in the ITT can be done quickly, easily, and with limited effort in a way that will last.

    This is the lesson many of my students learned that day in the hips & sacrum class, where we were focused on the hip.

    When we work the thigh, knee, lower leg, and foot we get a more complete picture of ITT tension that once felt impenetrable.

    In addition, I have several clients who have been diagnosed with IT Band Syndrome, which is classified as an overuse of the thigh and knee associated with running, biking, and hiking. I have had amazing results using SMRT for the thigh & knee, and incorporating the work for the lower leg, ankle, and foot, which helps with balance and mobility in the knee.

    Running, biking, and hiking are a few of the most common activities in Colorado!

    The 10% discount for our Boulder, CO SMRT: Thigh & Knee and SMRT: Lower Leg & Foot courses ends on Wednesday.

    These courses are also available in Santa Fe, NM. To register, please go to https://efullcircle.com/class-schedule/