• Inflamed Elbows

    Posted on October 24, 2014 by Dawn in Arm & Hand, Elbow, Golf Elbow, Massage Therapy Continuing Education, Special Issues, Spontaneous Muscle Release Technique, Tennis Elbow.

     

    Inflammation on the lateral aspect of the elbow is called lateral epicondylitis. This is also referred to as tennis elbow, although most people do not get lateral epicondylitis by playing tennis. Lateral epicondylitis is basically tendinitis of the lateral elbow. The specific tendons involved are those of extensor carpi radialis longus and the common extensor tendon, which is a common tendon for extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor digitorum communis, extensor carpi ulnaris, and extensor digiti minimi. All of these muscles originate at or near the lateral epicondyle of the humerus. Inflammation in this area is can be caused by repetitive movements of the elbow, by chronic tension in the extensor muscles of the forearm, and by bony misalignment at the elbow.

    Inflammation on the medial aspect of the elbow is called medial epicondylitis. This is also referred to as golfer’s elbow. Although not as common as lateral epicondylitis, and caused more often from golf, medial epicondylitis is also caused by common activities. Medial epicondylitis is tendonitis of the medial aspect of the elbow. The specific tendons involved are those of pronator teres, flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, flexor digitorum superficialis, and palmaris longus. All of these muscles originate on or near the medial epicondyle of the humerus. Again, inflammation can be caused by repetitive movements, chronic tension of the flexor muscles, and by bony misalignments at the elbow.

    100_0248Massage is fantastic for both of these common conditions. One of the most frequent comments I hear from clients is that in all the months or years they have had the pain in their elbow, no one has ever worked on it for any length of time or very directly. Most people are told their lateral or medial epicondylitis will last for 12 to 18 months, to wrap it, go easy on it, and take OTC pain meds as needed. Specific massage can make a incredible difference in the client’s pain and the length of time that pain lasts. Sometimes the repetitive movements that caused the condition are movements necessary to do their job. In these cases massage can be fantastic for maintenance. Join me and learn to work quickly, painlessly, deeply, and effectively using SMRT on the arm and hand. To learn more please go to https://efullcircle.com/spontaneous-muscle-release-technique-arm-hand/